YAL

YAL - Young Adult Literature Presenter Unit 2013/2014

 

Highlighted Strategy

Comparing 2 Texts
One of the strategies highlighted in this YAL Conference workshop is Comparing 2 Texts where students compare a particular incident as related by two different texts. Historical fiction personalizes history for students in ways that nonfiction often doesn’t. Informational text can provide important context for fictional accounts that makes them more meaningful.  It is crucial that students understand the purpose of each form as they seek a deeper understanding of historical events.

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Crow
by Barbara Wright

 

YAL Presenter Unit 2013/2014

Subjects: English
Grade Level: 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th
Posted: 2014, CCSS, Common Core State Standards
Unit Created by: Susan Garr and Christine Johnson


What makes this a good YAL choice...

Between 1868 and 1898 reconstruction brought Fusion Party Politics to North Carolina. Republicans and Populists joined together to create a more just society that promised constitutional rights for all. Many white Democrats opposed this shift in power, and the upcoming elections offered them an opportunity to take action. With the help of the media, the Democrats waged a campaign of hate and violence culminating in the only coup d'état ever to happen on U.S. soil. Known as the Wilmington Massacre, this incident destroyed a thriving African American community as well as the only daily African American newspaper in North Carolina. Fusion Party leaders, both black and white, were killed or banished. Author Barbara Wright tells the story of the Wilmington Massacre from the point of view of 12-year-old Moses Thomas. He and his family are active members of the community who work together to overcome adversity and keep their families together as best they can. 

 

We chose this book because of the powerful themes, compelling story line, and well-developed characters, as well as the connections that can be made between the past and the present. Crow challenges us to consider our role, and the role of our community, in building a society that is democratic, fair and just. This book is a perfect fit as a supplemental text in a unit focused on the big ideas of citizenship, democracy, post-Civil War/Reconstruction, Jim Crow, voting rights and the manipulation of political power. The abundance of available primary source materials makes for rich inquiry into this little known incident in American history.

 

As historical fiction, Crow provides a window into how hate, racism, and violence can be used so that one group of people can maintain institutional power over another. Crow asks us to consider the long historical struggle between those who have power in our country and those who don’t. It challenges the reader to consider the complexities of how our history both impacts and parallels our current realities. It confounds the reader as it reveals the true story of our country’s only coup d’état. — Susan Garr and Christine Johnson

 


YAL Conference Workshop Description
Crow: Democracy Denied or Delayed?
Susan Garr and Christine Johnson, Presenters

Between 1868 and 1898 reconstruction brought Fusion Party Politics to North Carolina. Republicans and Populists joined together to create a more just society that promised constitutional rights for all. Many white Democrats opposed this shift in power, and the upcoming elections offered them an opportunity to take action. With the help of the media, the Democrats waged a campaign of hate and violence culminating in the only coup d'état ever to happen on U.S. soil. The incident came to be known as the Wilmington Massacre. This incident destroyed a thriving community, the only black newspaper in North Carolina, as well as killed or banished Fusion Party leaders, both black and white. Author Barbara Wright uses historical fiction to tell the story of the Wilmington Massacre from the point of view of 12-year-old Moses Thomas. This hands-on workshop challenges participants to consider how the issues of 1898 Wilmington, NC relate to our world today. We will discuss connections between texts, using primary sources and other nonfiction pieces. Presenters will model group work, close reading, discussion strategies and inquiry stations. Participants will read, write, think, question and construct meaning relevant to their own lives as well as their students' lives. Join us in using Crow as an anchor text to explore our essential question: What role do I have in creating a more fair and just society? — Workshop Description for YAL 2013

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